Cancer

Nid Year Notes All terms
52 1 1973
Drasar BS, Irving D. Environmental factors and cancer of the colon and breast. British journal of cancer. 1973;27(2):167-72.
Cancer
53 2 1968

Migrants take on the disease risk of their new location, even if they don't intermarry. They change their diet and lifestyle. This suggests that diet and lifestyle are the principle cause of the disease, not genetics

Cancer
56 3 1999
Willett WC. Dietary fat and breast cancer. Toxicological Sciences. 1999;52:127-46. Abstract

Even when fat consumption was below 20%, there was no correlation with breast cancer.

Cancer, Nurses Health Study
81 4 2001

Trans fat linked to cancer

Cancer, Disease-Proof Your Child
187 5 1999

Of 144 human studies that showed statistically significant associations of fruits and vegetables with total cancer, ALL 144 showed a PROTECTIVE EFFECT. NO studies confirmed a protective effect of animal foods. 17 of 20 studies found that exercise protects against colon cancer.

ChCh04, ChCh08, Certificate in Plant-based Nutrition, Cancer, The China Study - Book
192 6 2010

1998: Male 47% chance of cancer; Female: 38%
2011: Male 44%; Female 38%;

ChCh01, Cancer, The China Study - Book
226 7 1990

biomarkers for breast cancer.

ChCh01, Cancer, The China Study - Book
310 8 2001

In 2000, we reported that there is no reliable evidence that screening for breast cancer reduces mortality. As we discuss here, a Cochrane review has now confirmed and strengthened our previous findings. The review also shows that breast-cancer mortality is a misleading outcome measure.* Finally, we use data supplemental to those in the Cochrane review to show that screening leads to more aggressive treatment. *(Uncertain causes of death were often ascribed to breast cancer, not to radiation). See also Hughes NS.

Certificate in Plant-based Nutrition, McDougall Lecture, Cancer, Getaway2010
317 9 1990
ChCh08, Cancer, The China Study - Book
319 10 1998
ChCh08, Cancer, The China Study - Book
564 11 2002

$30 million study; Two counties had rates 10-20% higher than the state average. cover story; (contrast: China, some parts 100 times higher)

ChCh04, Cancer
599 12 2008

Cruciferous vegetable (Chinese cabbage, bok choy, turnips) intake consistent with high isothiocyanate exposure may reduce breast cancer risk. Cruciferous vegetable intake also may ameliorate the effects of the GSTP1 genotype (which predisposes people to breast cancer). Subjects reporting greater turnip and Chinese cabbage intakes had a significantly lower postmenopausal breast cancer risk (half as much cancer). Women with the GSTP1 Val/Val genotype and low cruciferous vegetable intake had a breast cancer risk 1.74-fold that of women with the Ile/Ile or Ile/Val genotype. This effect of low cruciferous vegetable intake and the Val/Val genotype was seen predominantly among premenopausal women.

Half the cancer with higher intake.

Cancer, Getaway2010, Getaway2011
604 13 2009

higher fish intake and DHA levels decrease breast cancer incidence by 50%?

Cancer, Getaway2010, Getaway2011
606 14 2002

Frequent consumption of tomato products is associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer. The magnitude of the association is moderate and could easily be missed in a small study.

Cancer, Getaway2010, Getaway2011, Getaway2012
607 15 2008

Will men adhere to tomato intervention? Prostate cancer patients will consume diets rich in tomato products and soy with excellent compliance and bioavailability of phytochemicals.

Cancer, Getaway2010, Getaway2011, Getaway2012, Ti Sano 2013
629 16 2008

78% increased risk of all-cause mortality in the lowest quartile. Also, too much Vitamin D raises risk. (50% reduced risk of breast cancer. Dr. Fuhrman recommends 35 - 45 range. 2000/Day RDI is 400.)

Cancer, Getaway2010, Getaway2011
636 17 1998

3834 subjects (the Boyd Orr Cohort) tracked for 50 years. Least calories consumed in childhood: dramatic reductions in breast, prostate and colon cancer as adults. Each 238 calorie daily increase in consumption increased cancer mortality as an adult by 20%.

Animal studies have shown that energy restriction results in a reduced risk of cancer. Some cancers are more common in taller people, suggesting that the same effect may be important in humans
+ The association between diet in childhood and later cancer was examined on the basis of detailed dietary data collected from a cohort of children in the late 1930s
+ A positive association emerged between childhood energy intake and later cancer (other than cancer related to smoking), once adjustment for socioeconomic variables had been made
+ This evidence for long term effects of early diet confirms the importance of optimal childhood nutrition by implying that higher levels of energy intake in childhood increase the risk of the later development of cancer.

The effect of childhood energy intake on later mortality from cancer was seen only for cancers not related to smoking.

Children who consumed the highest quartile of fruit during childhood had a 38 percent lower occurrence of all cancers as adults

DPYCCH03, Cancer, Getaway2010, NET, Disease-Proof Your Child, ETLChapter1, Eat to Live e1
663 18 1996

Review of 206 human studies and 22 animal studies: raw vegetables have the most consistent and powerful association with the reduction of cancers of all types, including stomach, pancreas, colon, and breast

DPYCCH02, Eat to Live E2, Cancer, ETLChapter6, Getaway2010, VegSource Healthy Lifestyle Expo 2009, Disease-Proof Your Child
665 19 2008

case-controlled study of 4000+ women: strong association (25 - 30% reduction) between soy food and reduced incidence of the most common types of breast cancer: ER+/PR+/HER2- tumor

Cancer, Getaway2010
667 20 2005

Red meat, pork, processed meats demonstrated 68% increase in risk of cancer (comparing highest to lowest quintile)

Cancer, Getaway2010, VegSource Healthy Lifestyle Expo 2009
668 21 2009

Higher intake of saturated fat from dairy and meat more than doubled risk of pancreatic cancer

Cancer, Getaway2010, VegSource Healthy Lifestyle Expo 2009
669 22 2007

Chronic inflammation increases all causes of death. High white blood cell counts are a better predictive association than other markers. More than double the risk for breast cancer with higher numbers.

Cancer, Getaway2010, VegSource Healthy Lifestyle Expo 2009
670 23 2007

Low-carb/high protein increased CRP by 25%
High-carb/lo-fat reduced serum CRP by 43%

Cancer, Getaway2010, VegSource Healthy Lifestyle Expo 2009
674 24 2007

Cochrane review of 68 randomized trials. Vitamin A supplementation (20,000 IU) showed an average of 16% increase mortality risk. Beta carotene increased mortality risk by 7% (mean 3 years). No significant increased or decreased mortality from Vitamin C and selenium

Cancer, Getaway2010
699 25 2003

NRF-2 proteins are transcription factors that bind to, and active the ARE segments of genes. (These are cellular segments in DNA that produce protein that sucks free radicals out of tissue, more effectively than antioxidant. NRF-2 becomes activated (a normal function) when we eat green vegetables supplying ITCs. When we don't eat cruciferous greens the most important natural defense systems in the cell does not function.

Cancer, Getaway2011, Ti Sano 2013, NET
751 26 2009

This study found no association between grapefruit intake and breast cancer

Cancer, Getaway2010
752 27 2009

1 in 2000 undergoing mammograms have lifespan enhanced from detection and treatment. 10 in 2000 are hurt in some way from mammograms and subsequent treatment. 5 in 2000 with BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes for breast cancer have radiation induced increased mortality from mammograms

Cancer, Getaway2010
754 28 2002

Results agree with previous studies in favor of an increased risk of lung cancer after radiation therapy for breast cancer.

Cancer, Getaway2010
755 29 2001

No survival benefit for postmenopausal, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive women with breast cancr using adjuvant cyclophosphamide/methotrexate/5-fluorouracil (CMF)-type chemotherapy. 5.5% had longer disease-free life.

Cancer, Getaway2010
756 30 2003

Kaiser Health Foundation study: Medicare enrollees in higher-spending regions receive more care than those in lower-spending regions but do not have better health outcomes or satisfaction with care. (Dr. Fuhrman notes: "a third of medical spending is devoted to services that don't improve health or the quality of care, and may make things worse")

Cancer, Getaway2010, Super Immunity
757 31 2008

PSA screenings and medical interventions for prostate cancer not shown to extend lifespan for men

Cancer, Getaway2010
758 32 2005
Cancer, Getaway2010
759 33 2010

30% reduction in prostate cancer occurrence with those in the highest quartile of DHA intake. among those diagnosed at an early stage, men with the highest zinc intake (15 mg or more) were 74% less likely to die of prostate cancer. Zinc is low on a vegan diet, with low bioavailability. Zinc supplementation and half the mortality rate.

Cancer, Getaway2010, Getaway2011
761 34 2008

zinc reduces the risk of cancer; iron increases the risk

Cancer, Getaway2010
762 35 1999
Cancer, Getaway2010
763 36 2002
Cancer, Getaway2010
773 37 2004

61,000 women studied: Those who consumed 4 or more servings of total dairy products/day had a risk of serous ovarian cancer twice that of women who consumed <2 servings/day.

Cancer, Dairy
783 38 2005

Aggressive treatment not supported for localized low-grade prostate cancer. Men with low-grade prostate cancers have a minimal risk of dying from prostate cancer during 20 years of follow-up (Gleason score of 2-4, 6 deaths per 1000 person-years; 95% CI, 2-11). Men with high-grade prostate cancers have a high probability of dying from prostate cancer within 10 years of diagnosis (Gleason score of 8-10, 121 deaths per 1000 person-years; 95% CI, 90-156). Men with Gleason score of 5 or 6 tumors have an intermediate risk of prostate cancer death.

a, Cancer
784 39 2004

PSA invalid. No statistically significant difference was found in the incidence of Prostate Cancer (23.6%) between men with low and intermediate PSA levels in a Japanese population. The diagnostic yield was comparable to that reported for both white and black men.

a, Cancer
785 40 2003

No association between the intensity of PSA screening and subsequent decreases in prostate cancer mortality.

a, Cancer
790 41 2005
a, Cancer
797 42 2002

Rancid oils, rich in omega-6 unsaturated fatty acids, could be involved not only in tumor promotion but in initiation as well.

a, Cancer
803 43 2002

9.5 times the risk of advanced-stage prostate cancer among men with low blood levels of a protein that binds and inactivates IGF-1.

ChCh08, Cancer, The China Study - Book
833 44 2008

We found no evidence to support antioxidant supplements for primary or secondary prevention. Vitamin A, beta-carotene, and vitamin E may increase mortality.

Cancer
886 45 2000
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
887 46 1999
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
888 47 2000
Byers T. Diet, colorectal adenomas, and colorectal cancer. N Engl J Med. 2000;342(16):1206-7.
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
889 48 1999
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
890 49 1999
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
891 50 1999
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
892 51 1999
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
893 52 1999
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
894 53 1998
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
895 54 1998
Gerber M. Fibre and breast cancer. Eur J Cancer Prev. 1998;7 Suppl 2:S63-7. Abstract
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
896 55 1998
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
897 56 1997
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
898 57 1997
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
899 58 1997
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
900 59 1997
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
901 60 1997
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
902 61 1996
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
903 62 1995
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
904 63 1995
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
905 64 1994
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
906 65 1993
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
907 66 1993
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
908 67 1992
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
909 68 1991
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
910 69 1990
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
911 70 1990
Kimura M, Itokawa Y. Cooking losses of minerals in foods and its nutritional significance. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol. 1990;36 Suppl 1:S25-32; discussion S33. Abstract
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
912 71 1985
Cancer, Eat to Live e1
917 72 1999
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
918 73 1999
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
919 74 1999
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
920 75 1998
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
921 76 1998
Goodman GE. Prevention of lung cancer. Curr Opin Oncol. 1998;10(2):122-6. Abstract
Cancer, Stroke, DPYCCH05, Disease-Proof Your Child, Eat to Live e1
922 77 1998
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
923 78 1997
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
924 79 1996
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
925 80 1996
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
926 81 1995
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
927 82 1991
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
933 83 2001
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
934 84 2000
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
935 85 1999
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
936 86 1999
Cancer, DPYCCH04, Stroke, Disease-Proof Your Child, Eat to Live e1
937 87 1999
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
938 88 1999
Cancer, Stroke, DPYCCH05, Disease-Proof Your Child, Eat to Live e1
939 89 1999
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
940 90 1999
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
941 91 1999
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
942 92 1998
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
943 93 1998
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
944 94 1998
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
945 95 1998
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
946 96 1997
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
947 97 1997
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
948 98 1997
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
949 99 1997
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1
950 100 1997
Cancer, Stroke, Eat to Live e1