Radiation dose, chemotherapy and risk of lung cancer after breast cancer treatment.

Notes: 

Results agree with previous studies in favor of an increased risk of lung cancer after radiation therapy for breast cancer.

TitleRadiation dose, chemotherapy and risk of lung cancer after breast cancer treatment.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2002
AuthorsRubino C, de Vathaire F, Diallo I, Shamsaldin A, Grimaud E, Labbe M, Contesso G, Le M
JournalBreast cancer research and treatment
Volume75
Issue1
Pagination15-24
Date Published2002 Sep
ISSN0167-6806
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Breast Neoplasms, Case-Control Studies, Chemotherapy, Adjuvant, Cohort Studies, Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation, Female, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced, Radiotherapy, Risk Factors, Survivors
Abstract

It is of particular concern to evaluate the risk of lung cancer occurrence after breast cancer treatment as women with breast cancer quite often undergo radiation therapy as part of their initial treatment and their life expectancy remains long. From a roster of 7711 women initially treated for breast cancer between 1954 and 1984, a cohort-study was performed among 4171 1-year survivors followed during the period 1975-1995. The relationship between the radiation dose received by the lung and the risk of lung cancer was then evaluated in a nested case-control study of 11 breast-cancer patients who developed lung cancer and 22 controls matched for age at diagnosis of breast cancer, period of initial treatment and length of follow-up. Among the 4171 women, six developed lung cancer during the entire follow-up as compared to 5.4 cases expected (SIR = 1.1, 95% CI: 0.4-2.3). When considering only the women initially treated by radiotherapy with or without adjunction of chemotherapy and excluding the 10 first years of follow-up, the SIR was significantly increased (SIR = 3.2, 95%CI: 1.0-7.4). In the case-control study, nine of the 11 lung cancers occurred in the ipsilateral lung and two in the trachea. The overall odds ratio (OR) of lung cancer associated with initial radiotherapy was 1.4 (95% CI: 0.2-11.1) and an excess in the OR of 7% (90% CI: ? to 41%, p = 0.10) per gray delivered to the site of lung cancer was evidenced. Our results agree with previous studies in favor of an increased risk of lung cancer after radiation therapy for breast cancer.

Alternate JournalBreast Cancer Res. Treat.
PubMed ID12500931
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