Food deserts in Leon County, FL: disparate distribution of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-accepting stores by neighborhood characteristics.

TitleFood deserts in Leon County, FL: disparate distribution of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-accepting stores by neighborhood characteristics.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsRigby S, Leone AF, Kim H, Betterley C, Johnson MA, Kurtz H, Lee JS
JournalJournal of nutrition education and behavior
Volume44
Issue6
Pagination539-47
Date Published2012 Nov-Dec
ISSN1878-2620
KeywordsCommerce, Cross-Sectional Studies, Florida, Food Supply, Health Status Disparities, Humans, Income, Minority Groups, Public Assistance, Residence Characteristics, Rural Population, Social Environment, Socioeconomic Factors, Statistics, Nonparametric
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Examine whether neighborhood characteristics of racial composition, income, and rurality were related to distribution of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)-accepting stores in Leon County, Florida.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional; neighborhood and food store data collected in 2008.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Forty-eight census tracts as proxy of neighborhoods in Leon County, Florida. All stores and SNAP-accepting stores were identified from a commercial business directory and a United States Department of Agriculture SNAP-accepting store list, respectively (n = 288).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of SNAP-accepting stores across neighborhoods.

ANALYSIS: Descriptive statistics to describe distribution of SNAP-accepting stores by neighborhood characteristics. Proportions of SNAP-accepting stores were compared by neighborhood characteristics with Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests.

RESULTS: Of 288 available stores, 45.1% accepted SNAP benefits. Of the 48 neighborhoods, 16.7% had no SNAP-accepting stores. Proportions of SNAP-accepting grocery stores were significantly different by neighborhood racial composition and income. Primarily black neighborhoods did not have any supermarkets. Results were mixed with regard to distribution of food stores and SNAP-accepting stores by neighborhood racial composition, income, and rurality.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: This study suggests disparities in distribution of SNAP-accepting stores across neighborhood characteristics of racial composition, income, and rurality.

DOI10.1016/j.jand.2012.12.014
Alternate JournalJ Nutr Educ Behav
PubMed ID22236493
Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon
Get email updates
Recipes. upcoming classes.