Epidemiology of colorectal cancer revisited: are serum triglycerides and/or plasma glucose associated with risk?

TitleEpidemiology of colorectal cancer revisited: are serum triglycerides and/or plasma glucose associated with risk?
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1994
AuthorsMcKeown-Eyssen G
JournalCancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Volume3
Issue8
Pagination687-95
Date Published1994 Dec
ISSN1055-9965
KeywordsBile Acids and Salts, Blood Glucose, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Insulin, Male, Models, Biological, Risk Factors, Triglycerides
Abstract

Several aspects of Western diets, alcohol use, and exercise patterns which are related to the risk of colorectal cancer have systemic effects in common. Those which increase the risk of colorectal cancer are positively associated with serum triglycerides and plasma glucose; those which decrease risk are negatively associated with serum triglycerides and plasma glucose. These observations suggest the hypothesis that serum triglycerides and/or plasma glucose may themselves be associated with colorectal cancer risk. Evidence for associations between colorectal neoplasia and triglycerides and glucose comes from two recent studies of adenomatous polyps, presumed precursors for colorectal cancer, and from previous studies of diabetes and cancer. In addition, three randomized trials, one in humans and two in animal models, suggest that diets which would be expected to increase serum triglycerides and plasma glucose increase the levels of cellular indicators of colorectal cancer risk. Biological mechanisms explaining associations between colorectal neoplasia and serum triglycerides and/or plasma glucose might involve luminal or circulatory effects: (a) triglycerides and/or glucose may be associated with fecal bile acids, acids which are positively associated with colorectal cancer risk in epidemiological studies and which promote colorectal cancer in animal models; (b) serum triglycerides and/or plasma glucose might influence circulating hormones, such as insulin, which might themselves be involved in cancer development; (c) serum triglycerides and/or plasma glucose might be indicators of energy available through the circulation for neoplastic cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Alternate JournalCancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PubMed ID7881343
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