Carotenoid bioavailability is higher from salads ingested with full-fat than with fat-reduced salad dressings as measured with electrochemical detection.

Notes: 

More than 10 times as much of certain nutrients (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and lycopene) are absorbed from vegetables with nuts or seeds are consumed with the meal

TitleCarotenoid bioavailability is higher from salads ingested with full-fat than with fat-reduced salad dressings as measured with electrochemical detection.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsBrown MJ, Ferruzzi MG, Nguyen ML, Cooper DA, Eldridge AL, Schwartz SJ, White WS
JournalThe American journal of clinical nutrition
Volume80
Issue2
Pagination396-403
Date Published2004 Aug
ISSN0002-9165
KeywordsAdult, Antioxidants, Biological Availability, Carotenoids, Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid, Chylomicrons, Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated, Female, Food Analysis, Humans, Intestinal Absorption, Male, Vegetables
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The amount of dietary fat required for optimal bioavailability of carotenoids in plant matrices is not clearly defined.

OBJECTIVE: The objective was to quantify the appearance of carotenoids in plasma chylomicrons after subjects ingested fresh vegetable salads with fat-free, reduced-fat, or full-fat salad dressings.

DESIGN: The subjects (n = 7) each consumed 3 salads consisting of equivalent amounts of spinach, romaine lettuce, cherry tomatoes, and carrots with salad dressings containing 0, 6, or 28 g canola oil. The salads were consumed in random order separated by washout periods of > or =2 wk. Blood samples were collected hourly from 0 to 12 h. Chylomicrons were isolated by ultracentrifugation, and carotenoid absorption was analyzed by HPLC with coulometric array detection.

RESULTS: After ingestion of the salads with fat-free salad dressing, the appearance of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and lycopene in chylomicrons was negligible. After ingestion of the salads with reduced-fat salad dressing, the appearance of the carotenoids in plasma chylomicrons increased relative to that after ingestion of the salads with fat-free salad dressing (P < 0.04). Similarly, the appearance of the carotenoids in plasma chylomicrons was higher after the ingestion of salads with full-fat than with reduced-fat salad dressing (P < 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS: High-sensitivity HPLC with coulometric array detection enabled us to quantify the intestinal absorption of carotenoids ingested from a single vegetable salad. Essentially no absorption of carotenoids was observed when salads with fat-free salad dressing were consumed. A substantially greater absorption of carotenoids was observed when salads were consumed with full-fat than with reduced-fat salad dressing.

Alternate JournalAm. J. Clin. Nutr.
PubMed ID15277161
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