Cardiovascular disease and distribution of cognitive function in elderly people: the Rotterdam Study.

TitleCardiovascular disease and distribution of cognitive function in elderly people: the Rotterdam Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1994
AuthorsBreteler MM, Claus JJ, Grobbee DE, Hofman A
JournalBMJ (Clinical research ed.)
Volume308
Issue6944
Pagination1604-8
Date Published1994 Jun 18
ISSN0959-8138
KeywordsAge Distribution, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Arteriosclerosis, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cerebrovascular Disorders, Cognition, Cognition Disorders, Educational Status, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Mental Status Schedule, Middle Aged, Myocardial Infarction, Prospective Studies, Sex Distribution
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the distribution of cognitive function in elderly people and to assess the impact of clinical manifestations of atherosclerotic disease on this distribution.

DESIGN: Single centre population based cross sectional door to door study.

SETTING: Ommoord, a suburb of Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

SUBJECTS: 4971 subjects aged 55 to 94 years.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Cognitive function as measured by the mini mental state examination.

RESULTS: The overall participation rate in the study was 80%. Cognitive test data were available for 90% of the participants. Increasing age and lower educational level were associated with poorer cognitive function. Previous vascular events, presence of plaques in the carotid arteries, and presence of peripheral arterial atherosclerotic disease were associated with worse cognitive performance independent of the effects of age and education. On average the differences were moderate; however, they reflected the net result of a shift of the total population distribution of cognitive function towards lower values. Thereby, they resulted in a considerable increase in the proportion of subjects with scores indicative of dementia.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings are compatible with the view that atherosclerotic disease accounts for considerable cognitive impairment in the general population.

Alternate JournalBMJ
PubMed ID8025427
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