ChCh01

Nid Year Notessort icon All terms
6 1 1998
Bender R, Trautner C, Spraul M, Berger M. Assessment of excess mortality in obesity. American journal of epidemiology. 1998;147(1):42-8. Abstract
ChCh01, The China Study - Book
13 2 1994
ChCh01, The China Study - Book, China Study - Journal Article
15 3 1993
ChCh01, The China Study - Book, China Study - Journal Article
16 4 1993
ChCh01, The China Study - Book, China Study - Journal Article
61 5 2010
ChCh01, The China Study - Book
225 6 1998
Primary Care: Balancing Health Needs, Services, and Technology. New York: Oxford University Press; 1998.
ChCh01, The China Study - Book
223 7 2002

1/3 of adults aged 20+ are obese. Obesity even in toddlers.

ChCh01, The China Study - Book
10 8 1998

106,000 die from adverse drug events.

ChCh01, The China Study - Book
17 9 1992
Leape LL. Unnecessary surgery. Annual review of public health. 1992;13:363-83.

12,000 die from unnecessary surgery

ChCh01, The China Study - Book
228 10 2002

15% of U.S. youth are overweight, 15% more at risk of overweight.

ChCh01, ChCh06, The China Study - Book
192 11 2010

1998: Male 47% chance of cancer; Female: 38%
2011: Male 44%; Female 38%;

ChCh01, Cancer, The China Study - Book
3 12 2000
Starfield B. Is US health really the best in the world? JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association. 2000;284(4):483-5.

225,400 deaths per year. U.S. way behind other developed countries.

Adverse drug effects (at normal doses) 106,000
nosocomial infection 80,000
unnecessary surgery 12,000
medication errors 74,000, and other preventable hospital errors 20,000. [This summary incorporates additional information from journals featured in the China Study]

ChCh01, The China Study - Book
270 13 2000

34% of diabetics aren't aware of their illness. Meanwhile, incidence booms. 70%, 40%, and 31% increase in 8-year period, among people in their 30s, 40s, and 50s, respectively. (1990 - 1998) Economic consequences, (citing Diabetes Care 23): $98 Billion

ChCh01, ChCh07, The China Study - Book
11 14 1998

7400 die from medication errors.

ChCh01, The China Study - Book
18 15 1991

biomarkers for breast cancer.

ChCh01, The China Study - Book
226 16 1990

biomarkers for breast cancer.

ChCh01, Cancer, The China Study - Book
154 17 1995

Coronary disease could be prevented, arrested, or even reversed by maintaining total serum cholesterol levels below 150 mg/dL. (Dean Ornish also showed that CVD can be reversed. ) "This is the longest study of minimal fat nutrition used in combination with cholesterol-lowering drugs conducted to date, and our finding of a mean decrease of arterial stenosis [blockage] of 7.0% is greater than any reports in previous research." The ones who dropped out of the program had 10 new coronary events.

ChCh01, ChCh05, ChCh08, Certificate in Plant-based Nutrition, Duplicate, Esselstyn Lecture, The China Study - Book, Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease
23 18 2011

CVD accounted for 33.6% (813, 804) of deaths in 2007. 76.4 million Americans have hypertension.

ChCh01, The China Study - Book
22 19 2011
CDC National Diabetes Fact Sheet. , editors. Atlanta, Georgia; 2011.

Diabetes outcomes: Heart disease and stroke, Hypertension, Blindness and eye problems, Kidney disease, Nervous system disorders, Amputations, Dental disease, Complications of pregnancy, Other complications. • Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death based on U.S. death certificates in 2007. This ranking is based on the 71,382 death certificates in 2007 in which diabetes was the underlying cause of death. Diabetes was a contributing cause of death in an additional 160,022 death certificates for a total of 231,404 certificates in 2007 in which diabetes appeared as any-listed cause of death.
• Diabetes is likely to be underreported as a cause of death. Studies have found that about 35% to 40% of decedents with diabetes had it listed anywhere on the death certificate and about 10% to 15% had it listed as the underlying cause of death.
• Overall, the risk for death among people with diabetes is about twice that of people of similar age but without diabetes.
Overall, the risk for death among people with diabetes is about twice that of people of similar age but without diabetes.
Estimated diabetes costs in the United States, 2007
Total (direct and indirect)
$174 billion
1/3 don't know they have it.

ChCh01, ChCh07, The China Study - Book
14 20 1994
Campbell TC, Junshi C. Diet and chronic degenerative diseases: perspectives from China. The American journal of clinical nutrition. 1994;59(5 Suppl):1153S-1161S. Abstract

diet and disease

ChCh01, The China Study - Book
134 21 2001

Intervention Study. 10 lbs lost in 3 weeks

ChCh01, ChCh06
2 22 2002
Anderson RN. Deaths: leading causes for 2000. National vital statistics reports : from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System. 2002;50(16):1-85. Abstract

Medical treatment is the 3rd leading cause of death in the US, following heart disease, and cancer.

ChCh01, The China Study - Book
21 23 1970

Philippine children consumed aflatoxin from moldy peanut butter AF metabolites were measured in the urine. Highest liver cancer, in areas of highest AF consumption.

ChCh01, ChCh02, The China Study - Book
20 24 1990

Prevention and Reversal. Comprehensive lifestyle changes may be able to bring about regression of even severe coronary atherosclerosis after only 1 year, without use of lipid-lowering drugs. [See also Esselstyn]

ChCh01, The China Study - Book
122 25 2002

Trends in the Age-Adjusted and Age-Specific Prevalence of Obesity for Adults Aged 20-74 Years
1960: 13.4% Obese
1970: 14.5%
1980: 15.0%
1990: 23.3
2000: 30.9

ChCh01, ChCh06, Certificate in Plant-based Nutrition, Similar, The China Study - Book
224 26 2000

United States totaled almost $1.15 trillion, increasing
less than 6 percent from the previous year and
continuing the slowdown in growth of the 1990’s.
During the 1980’s national health expenditures grew at
an average annual rate of 11 percent (table 115).

Despite the slowdown in the growth of health
spending, the United States continues to spend a larger
share of GDP on health than any other major
industrialized country. The United States devoted
13.4 percent of GDP to health in 1997 compared with
about 10–11 percent each in Germany, Switzerland,
and France, the countries with the next highest shares.

ChCh01, The China Study - Book
8 27 1969

We eat out more than ever

ChCh01, The China Study - Book